Categories: Associated British Ports, Business, SouthamptonPublished On: 04.10.2021319 words1.6 min read

BT trials drone and AI technology with the Port of Southampton in association with Associated British Ports and RoboK

BT has successfully completed an automated drone trial at the Port of Southampton in partnership with Associated British Ports (ABP) and RoboK. The trial demonstrated a drone flying over the port’s vehicle inventory lot, with images captured and fed into an artificial intelligence (AI) powered system to track and analyse vehicle occupancy levels.

The trial forms part of ABP’s ambitions to harness the latest technologies to improve operational efficiency, accuracy and safety for its ports and customers. For ABP, implementing drone automation with AI provides a breadth of opportunities to exploit data and provide accurate management of its sites, asset control and enhanced security.

Through its long-standing innovation partnership with ABP, BT has used drone technology to trial a fully automated process to identify, track and analyse the number of vehicles across the port at any given time. This is key for ABP’s business to allow for accurate billing, better management of operational costs and insight-led decision making for the port’s management team.  As part of the trial, BT partnered with RoboK, a Cambridge based start-up specialising in efficient 3D computer vision. RoboK’s use of innovative AI technology was able to detect, track and count vehicles in real time, captured from the drone footage.

The trial sees BT and ABP working together to understand the potential use cases for “drone-in-a-box” (DIAB) solutions in port environments. Unlike traditional drones, DIAB systems deploy autonomously from a box that also functions as a landing pad and charging base. After carrying out their instructions, these drones return to their “base” to charge and upload information. DIAB solutions can better manage port inventory, address port-wide health and safety monitoring, optimise site management, support search and rescue missions, and improve maritime control . . . .

. . . . continue reading the article at the sUAS website here