Categories: Environment and Renewables, News, Port Of PeterheadPublished On: 15.04.2021475 words2.4 min read

The Port of Peterhead has been named as the ideal UK-wide hub to facilitate a carbon capture and storage (CCS) boom in the north of Scotland.

“A report by the ACT Acorn CCS project has singled out Peterhead’s deepwater port as the key location for the transfer of 16 million tonnes of CO2, thanks to its location close to existing North Sea pipelines and infrastructure”

A report by the ACT Acorn CCS project has singled out Peterhead’s deepwater port as the key location for the transfer of 16 million tonnes of CO2, thanks to its location close to existing North Sea pipelines and infrastructure. The CO2could come from industrial hubs around the UK and also from mainland Europe.

The ACT Acorn project, recognised as a European Project of Common Interest, has eight European partners and is led by Aberdeenshire company Pale Blue Dot, a specialist in carbon capture, utilisation and storage.

It has received funding from the UK Government’s Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the Research Council of Norway and the Netherlands Enterprise Agency, with co-funding by the European Commission under the Accelerating CCS Technology (ACT) programme.Studies were completed in 2019, and the project is working towards a demonstrator in 2021.

The first phase would involve capturing CO2 directly from St Fergus Gas Terminal, sending it offshore via existing pipelines due for decommissioning, and storing it in sites under the North Sea. Further ahead, the project is looking at the potential for hydrogen manufacture at St Fergus as a way of ‘decarbonising’ gas.

In a subsequent phase, ACT Acorn has set out plans for importing CO2 by ship and transferring it by pipeline via Peterhead Power Station to St Fergus.Peterhead Port has plenty of capacity for the import quantities of CO2envisaged for the early build out phases of Acorn CCS, says the project report.

A fleet of three or four tankers of 30,000 to 50,000 DWT (equivalent to 24,000 to 40,000 tonnes CO2) would be required to service routes from CO2 export hubs within the North Sea area.

The ships carrying CO2 could come from the UK or across the North Sea, says Steve Murphy, finance director of Pale Blue Dot. “Access to the port could provide an integrated CO2 transport and storage service”, he says. “Within 50 kms of pipeline, there is 40-50% of the UK’s storage resource. We are talking about a great geographical asset in terms of storage, pipelines and port infrastructure”.

Peterhead was also one of the founder members of NECCUS – an alliance of industry and government formed to develop a framework for the deployment of carbon capture to industrial sites around Scotland. The project will also enable hydrogen to be used as a source of clean energy. Together, these techniques are essential components of Scotland’s journey to carbon net zero by 2045.

Extract from the Peterhead Port Handbook 2021 here

Carbon Capture Ahead
Carbon Capture Ahead