Categories: a-port-information, British Ports Association, BusinessPublished On: 01.06.2020389 words1.9 min read

Click here to download the report [PDF]

  • New research finds that no ports in the world have installed cold ironing (shore to ship electricity) without public funding or subsidy
  • Green maritime fund needed in UK to support emissions reductions, including support for shore power where it is viable
  • BPA willing to discuss viability of a zero-emission standard with wider maritime industry as a way to drive demand and certainty for green investment

The British Ports Association has published new research examining the barriers to shore power in UK ports, setting out three proposals to support the industry to meet ambitious emissions reductions targets.

Shore power, also known as cold ironing, is the provision of shore-based electricity to ships at berth, allowing them to turn off their auxiliary engines. These auxiliary engines are used for crew and passenger accommodation and cargo operations (such as pumps or heating or cooling systems) and typically use a type of diesel. Shore connections either provide power from the grid or nearby generation sources. They are commonly fixed at one berth but mobile solutions (by barge) are also in operation.

There are currently no large scale shore power connections in UK ports, due to the prohibitively high capital costs associated with such projects. The price of electricity in the UK and a general lack of consistent demand also means that there is rarely a commercially viable business case for investing in shore power. Such systems, however, have the potential to significantly reduce emissions from ships at berth.

The report identifies three primary barriers and three proposed solutions:

Primary Barriers

  1. High capital costs, both within the port and associated with energy network upgrades
  2. High electricity prices make it difficult to compete with relatively cheap marine fuel
  3. A lack of consistent demand from shipping, although that may be starting to turn for some parts of some sectors

Proposals

  1. a Green Maritime Fund to support emissions reductions projects, including shore power
  2. The removal of taxes on electricity from shoreside power in line with that available for marine fuel
  3. Goal-based approach to increasing demand, such as a zero emission berth standard

Commenting on the report, Mark Simmonds, Head of Policy at the British Ports Association, said: . . . . 

. . . . continue reading the article on the BPA website here

BPA_Shore_Power_Paper_May_2020