UK fishing industry told to cut down on drinking after majority of port deaths linked to alcohol

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UK fishing industry told to cut down on drinking after majority of port deaths linked to alcohol

The fishing industry has been told to cut down on boozing after nearly two thirds of port deaths were linked to alcohol.

Commercial fishing has become ‘the most dangerous occupation in Britain’, with six fishermen dying in just one year – five of which were in Scotland.

But new stats from the Marine Accident Investigation Board (MAIB) show that since 1992, booze has contributed to 62 per cent of fatalities on fishing vessels in port.

The MAIB has made recommendations to the Sea Fish Industry Authority (SFIA), based in Edinburgh, that drug and alcohol policies are further clarified.

The maritime alcohol limit is the same as Scotland’s drink-driving laws – set at 50mg of alcohol in 100ml of blood.

The MAIB said: “There appears to be little awareness of the risk alcohol poses or any guidance on its consumption when crew are of duty and living on board a vessel while in port.

“Boarding a fishing vessel from a quayside while under the influence of alcohol, and then negotiating the ladders and hatches on board, poses considerable risk.

“Regrettably, all too often the dangers of consuming alcohol are overlooked . . . .

. . . . continue reading at The Scotsman website